When Writing Seems to be a Chore

When you have to write your 1000 words for the day of your novel or even a short but essential blog post and all you can think about is doing the dishes instead or doing that project in the garage that you’ve been putting off people are apt to call it ‘writer’s block’. If you overcome that block to actually sit down and do the writing you have pledged to do then that’s when you become a writer. At this moment I’m really talking to those that would like to become professionals. As an owner of a site like Pan Historia I am fully a champion of those that come to write just for the pure fun of it. If you’re a surfer you don’t grab a surfboard and head to the beach on a day you’re not in the mood. In this post I am addressing those of you that want to be professional writers, and I place myself among you.

My inspiration this morning came from my own disinclination to write a blog on writing. Over the short time I have maintained this blog I have written a number of short articles on the craft of writing, both general and for the relatively new field of collaborative self-published fiction. All the standard advice for bloggers contains the advice to keep your blog fresh with new content, but what happens when you run out of ideas? There are only so many topics right? Or is that just me avoiding writing when I know I should? It’s very probably the latter. Actually it’s definitely the latter.

Whenever, as a writer, you feel ‘blocked’ it’s time to write around it, or through it. Several things can happen: 1) you can spend hours writing a crappy post/chapter (and I still say hooray for you because there is growth in failure, perhaps more so than success) and have to throw it away. 2) you find yourself picking up speed and really getting into your topic/story. 3) you can discover what is that is really blocking you in a particular piece. If the result of writing through a block is number one you still have to do it all over again your next writing period. You cannot let that hurdle cause you to stumble – not if you want to be a professional. Remember writing as a career has deadlines and schedules just like any other job. Because most writers are their own supervisors (if not their own boss) that means developing a strong writing discipline.

Even if you are as of yet unpublished it’s a really smart idea to establish good working practices. If you’re not being paid yet (oh, grasshopper) then it’s often even more difficult to overcome the roadblocks put in your path by your own mind and by others… oh yes, others. If you work from home you know how many times friends and relatives will say “you’re not doing anything, can you help?” If you have a significant other, even a supportive one, there will be lapses. “I was at work all day, and you were at home, why didn’t you clean the __________?” You can fill in the blanks. Creating a strong and regular writing schedule for yourself, that you don’t cheat on, means sticking to it, regardless of the views of friends and loved ones. You might have a lot of diverse responsibilities such as kids, jobs, or looking after a relative, but if you are serious about being a writer you still need to carve out the time.

I have talked on this subject before, and at length, but I don’t think it can be repeated enough. I have several friends who are published writers and when a novice comes to them for advice it’s always the same: you wanna write? Then write.

There: I have written.

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About panhistoria

writer, online community creator, and artist View all posts by panhistoria

3 responses to “When Writing Seems to be a Chore

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